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The voice of Queensland horticulture.


Industry Policy

Growcom’s Advocacy and Policy Unit (APU) strives to provide influential representation, strong leadership and committed action on behalf of horticulture growers and their businesses.

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Join the peak industry body for horticulture.

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Who we are

Growcom is the peak representative body for Queensland horticulture and strives for the long term growth and profitability of horticultural farms and the industry. Our core membership consists of Queensland’s fruit and vegetable producers and individuals, groups and industries who have a stake or interest in the future of Queensland horticulture. Growcom exists to:

  • Provide strong leadership to horticultural growers in developing policy on issues affecting production horticulture
  • Provide powerful representation of horticultural interests to local, state and national governments, government agencies and key stakeholders in the supply chain
  • Deliver professional services to horticultural growers and other horticultural stakeholders to enhance their business efficiency and profitability
  • Provide an information hub on issues relating to horticulture at a state and national level.

Growcom Spotlight

18
December

Growers of $50 billion horticultural industry get ‘Voice’

  • December 18, 2014
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Growers of $50 billion horticultural industry get ‘Voice’ 18 December 2014 Growers across 21 horticultural industries have united under the ‘Voice of... Read More
25
November

Take control of your business and personal finances – a workshop for women in agribusiness (Boonah)

  • November 25, 2014
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Take control of your business and personal finances – a workshop for women in agribusiness (Boonah) Tuesday, 25 November 2014... Read More
07
November

WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Bundaberg and Gayndah

  • November 07, 2014
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WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Bundaberg and Gayndah Friday, 7... Read More
06
November

Ready, set, grow your market – Women in Horticulture workshop (Caboolture)

  • November 06, 2014
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Ready, set, grow your market – Women in Horticulture workshop (Caboolture) Wednesday, 6 November 2014 Women in horticulture in the... Read More

Industry News

A Victorian fruit grading equipment manufacturer has been awarded the 2014 Australian Exporter of the Year Award. GP Graders snared the overall award after being named the winner of the manufacturing category.
Source: Queensland Country Life


Yarra Valley growers have secured the exclusive rights to a new berry variety never before marketed in Australia. The coup means they are seeking new growers — about three in each state — with the aim of having 60 000 trees under production in five years.
Source: Weekly Times Now


Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that greater protection is now available from the Non-insured Crop Disaster Assistance Program for crops that traditionally have been ineligible for federal crop insurance. The new options, created by the 2014 Farm Bill, provide greater coverage for losses when natural disasters affect specialty crops such as vegetables, fruits, mushrooms, floriculture, ornamental nursery, aquaculture, turf grass, ginseng, honey, syrup, and energy crops.
Source: Imperial Valley News


Not everyone wants to see a doctor when they're feeling down, let alone a psychologist. But, it seems one service in North Queensland is finding a way to help rural families struggling through drought. Cairns-based psychologist Crispian Jones travels to stations surrounding Georgetown and Croydon for one week every month to offer free counselling to graziers at their kitchen tables and back verandas.
Source: QLD Country Hour
Seven days out, forecasts suggest Christmas Day across Australia will be typically hot, humid and thundery in the north, windy in the south, wet in the southeast and dry on the west coast. Possible estimated Christmas Day extremes are: 29 mm at Camooweal in Queensland's northwest (wettest) and three hours of sunshine at Mt Isa northwest (cloudiest).
Source: Queensland Country Life


In the shade of a mango plantation, an hour's drive south of Cambodia's capital Phnom Penh, a group of Australian researchers are busy checking trees.
Source: ABC Rural


Steel, timber and food manufacturers have all welcomed the Federal Government's strengthening of anti-dumping system. Australia won a case against Italian tinned tomatoes, but has struggled to prove dumping of cheap timber and paper, Asian steel and tinned South African peaches. Parliamentary Industry Secretary Bob Baldwin says the Anti-Dumping Commission will now have more staff, and the onus will be on foreign companies.
Source: ABC Rural


The accusations relate to millions of dollars extracted from growers to fund the retail giant’s new “Cheap Cheap” campaign. This comes just days after Coles settled two court cases where it was accused of “unconscionable conduct” against supplies.
Source: Weekly Times Now


What will be on your Christmas dinner table next week? Maybe a nice glazed ham, some sweet mango cheeks, and surely lots of vegies - most probably a few carrots, according to a monthly consumer behaviour survey. The Project Harvest survey has revealed the top 12 most commonly bought vegetables leading into Christmas, starting with carrots, followed by broccoli, potatoes, capsicum, lettuce and sweet corn.
Source: ABC Rural


A food processing consultant says Coles supermarket got off lightly in reaching a settlement with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Coles will pay a $10 million out of court settlement, admitting it engaged in unconscionable conduct in its dealings with nearly 200 grocery suppliers. Suppliers hope to be paid back some of the profits.
Source: ABC Rural


In a recent article on The Conversation, Queensland coal seam gas (CSG) researchers argued that industry is progressing faster than the science, leading to concerns over fugitive emissions and impacts on water. The Southern Cross University team found unexpectedly high levels of methane in the air near CSG wells. They concluded that we do not yet know enough about the impact of CSG mining. The underground pore space where CSG is found – known to geologists as “sedimentary basins” – is one of our most important resources.
Source: The Conversation


A new body with a direct line to the Queensland Cabinet has been established to tackle the issue of agricultural electricity costs. The Agricultural Energy Council (AEC) will include high profile representatives from the DAFF; the Department of Energy and Water Supply; AgForce; Queensland Farmers’ Federation, Growcom and other key industry groups. It will report to the Agriculture Cabinet Committee. The AEC will look at specific issues including metering, the development of energy efficiency initiatives and financing, tariff reform, opportunities that may arise from future competition in the electricity market, the potential for renewable energy, and participation in the national regulatory process.
Source: ABC Rural


Women who eat fewer than two serves of fruit a day face a greater risk of developing depression, University of Queensland research shows. UQ School of Population Health’s Professor Gita Mishra said the findings of a six-year study of more than 6000 Australian women revealed a clear link between fruit consumption and the development of depressive symptoms.
Source: UQ News


The Prime Minister Tony Abbott says his government is fully committed to setting up a national register of foreign-owned farmland, despite revelations the process could still take months. The perception foreigners were buying up great swathes of Australian farmland got such traction ahead of the 2013 election campaign.
Source: ABC Rural


The group responsible for setting organic standards has rejected an application by the Western Australian Agriculture Department to allow a tolerance to genetically modified (GM) material in organic products. The Western Australian Government lodged the application after farmer Steve Marsh lost his organic certification when GM material from a neighbour's property allegedly came onto his.
Source: ABC Rural


Vietnam has stopped issuing import permits for about $40 million worth of Australian fruit from January. Australian officials have failed to allay Vietnamese Government concerns about the management of fruit fly. Fruit fly costs Australia $300 million a year in lost export markets.
Source: ABC Rural


Processed food and drinks that carry fruit and vegetable claims on their packaging contain as little as 13 per cent real fruit and many have negligible nutritional value, a study has found. The less healthy the food, the more likely it was to enthuse about its fruit content.
Source: Queensland Country Life


Low returns for wine grapes have seen growers look to the dried fruit industry as a lifeline, according to a major processor. Australian Premium Dried Fruits chief executive officer Mike Maynard says there's plenty of capacity in the market for new growers to come on board.
Source: ABC Rural


The Federal Government hopes the Free Trade Agreement with China will take effect before the end of next year. The Korea Free Trade Agreement came into force last week.
Source: ABC Rural


The Federal Trade Minister Andrew Robb has announced that Australia's free trade agreement with Japan will begin on January 15. Mr Robb says the implementation of the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement (JAEPA) will mean exporters will benefit from two rounds of tariff cuts in the first half of 2015.
Source: ABC Rural


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