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Industry Policy

Growcom’s Advocacy and Policy Unit (APU) strives to provide influential representation, strong leadership and committed action on behalf of horticulture growers and their businesses.

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Join the peak industry body for horticulture.

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Who we are

Growcom is the peak representative body for Queensland horticulture and strives for the long term growth and profitability of horticultural farms and the industry. Our core membership consists of Queensland’s fruit and vegetable producers and individuals, groups and industries who have a stake or interest in the future of Queensland horticulture. Growcom exists to:

  • Provide strong leadership to horticultural growers in developing policy on issues affecting production horticulture
  • Provide powerful representation of horticultural interests to local, state and national governments, government agencies and key stakeholders in the supply chain
  • Deliver professional services to horticultural growers and other horticultural stakeholders to enhance their business efficiency and profitability
  • Provide an information hub on issues relating to horticulture at a state and national level.

Growcom Spotlight

07
November

WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Bundaberg and Gayndah

WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Bundaberg and Gayndah Friday, 7... Read More
06
November

Ready, set, grow your market – Women in Horticulture workshop (Caboolture)

  • November 06, 2014
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Ready, set, grow your market – Women in Horticulture workshop (Caboolture) Wednesday, 6 November 2014 Women in horticulture in the... Read More
04
November

Building soil carbon for improved soil health, productivity and profits

  • November 04, 2014
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Building soil carbon for improved soil health, productivity and profits Wednesday, 5 November 2014 Growcom and NQ Dry Tropics are... Read More
31
October

WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Stanthorpe and Gatton

  • October 31, 2014
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WHS and WorkCover will be the special focus of this year’s Workplace Essentials Seminars in Stanthorpe and Gatton Friday, 31... Read More

Industry News

The South Australian Government will hold a round table discussion on the possibility of creating an export hub for the horticulture industry north of Adelaide.
Source: ABC Rural
A potato genetically engineered to reduce the amounts of a potentially harmful ingredient in french fries and potato chips has been approved for commercial planting, the US Department of Agriculture says. The potato's DNA has been altered so that less of a chemical, acrylamide, suspected of causing cancer, is produced when the potato is fried.
Source: The Land
Ausveg has expressed a lack of surprise at comments by Australian Competition and Consumer Commission Chairman Mr Rod Sims stating the watchdog had been unable to find evidence that Australian growers were unfairly pressured into contributing to a Woolworths marketing campaign featuring Jamie Oliver.
Source: Fresh Plaza
Despite not having to pull on the suit and tie as much, there are enough issues back on the farm to keep St George onion grower Andrew Moon busy. Having chaired the national representative body, Onions Australia for the past three years, Mr Moon has seen his share of industry trials.
Source: Queensland Country Life
The disease risk to Australia's pineapple industry has been thrust back into the spotlight with Federal Member for Capricornia Michelle Landry raising the issue in the last sitting of parliament. Ms Landry warned Federal Parliament that Queensland's $80 million a year pineapple industry was in danger of being wiped out because of a push by bureaucrats to allow fresh de-crowned pines to be imported from Malaysia.
Source: Queensland Country Life
A group of north Queensland banana growers have won a Highly Commended Award in the Queensland Safe Work Awards 2014. Jade and Craig Buchanan from LMB Farms and Steve Lizzio and his family from Liverpool River Bananas were recognised in the Best Workplace Health and Wellbeing Initiative category. It is believed to be the first time that farming enterprises have been acknowledged in the awards.
Source: Stock and Land
Two southern Queensland women who have been organising drought relief donations say they are amazed at the ongoing support from urban areas. Natasha Johnston and Nicki Blackwell formed the Drought Angels earlier this year and have been using social media to highlight the impact of the prolonged dry.
Source: ABC Rural
Farmers in northern Australia are being urged to avoid expanding new industries and businesses too quickly, in order to better develop the region. The 2014 Food Futures conference in Darwin has brought together farmers, politicians and researchers from the Northern Territory, Queensland and Western Australia to consider how to improve agricultural output and tap into emerging Asian markets.
Source: ABC Rural
Horticulture provides New Zealand with the opportunities to make more money from highly priced farmland and to diversify the New Zealand economy. The horticulture industry earns more than five times the export dollars per hectare than dairying with 123 000 hectares resulting in more than $3.5 billion in exports.
Source: Fresh Plaza
The Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries has confirmed cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) has been detected in a pumpkin crop in the Northern Territory. Properties in declared quarantine areas will not be able to move, sell or plant any of the virus’ declared host plants, which include watermelons, cucumbers and squash. To date CGMMV has not been detected in Queensland.
Source: North Queensland Register
Katherine watermelon producers crippled by the outbreak of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus could be producing interim crops on Northern Territory government-owned land in the not-too-distant future under a proactive plan to keep them financially viable during growing bans on their own properties.
Source: North Queensland Register
Cherry growers in Central West New South Wales say the Federal Government needs to act quickly to save exports of fresh fruit to Vietnam. The government says the Vietnamese Government is considering suspending trade in Australian fruit due to concerns over fruit fly management.
Source: ABC Rural
French farmers dumped potatoes in a central Paris square in a nationwide day of protest as a price drop on produce of 20 per cent looms.
Source: Sydney Morning Herald
A 350-year-old book showcasing tree-planting techniques in 17th century England has been donated to the Australian National University in Canberra.
Source: 666 ABC Canberra
Horticulture Australia Limited has formally notified all fruit, vegetable, nut and nursery sectors that it can't pay any research, development and marketing funds for at least four weeks. The timing is difficult for those industries who start summer harvest and want money to spend on marketing and research now.
Source: ABC Rural
An exotic bacteria that has become widespread in Europe has triggered emergency biosecurity measures in Australia. Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum causes leaf curling, leaf yellowing, stunting and root abnormalities in carrots and celery. The bacterium is not present in Australia, however the Department of Agriculture is implementing additional biosecurity measures to help protect the industries in Australia which are worth $190 million and $34 million a year respectively.
Source: Stock and Land
Weekend rain and light showers have been neither a hindrance nor a help, with local growers receiving a mixed bag of limited rainfall across the region as a result of patchy thunderstorms.
Source: News Mail

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